Tag Archiv: CONCERT

Denny Ilett sings Sinatra – live at JazzAscona 2015 (interview and concert)

Denny Ilett sings Sinatra - live at JazzAscona 2015 (interview and concert)



Views:2085|Rating:4.44|View Time:3:4Minutes|Likes:8|Dislikes:1
Denny Ilett, vocals
Jonny Bruce, trumpet
Craig Crofton, tenor saxophone
Ian Bateman, trombone
Ben Waghorn, baritone saxophone/clarinet
Dan Moore, piano
Andy Crowdy, bass
Julie Saury, drums

From : UK, F
Style: Vocal Jazz, Tribute to Frank Sinatra

FIRST TIME IN ASCONA

Tributo a Frank Sinatra: gli anni della Capitol

In questo meraviglioso, nuovo spettacolo appositamente allestito per celebrare il centenario di Frank Sinatra, Denny Ilett ha riunito attorno a sé uno swingante gruppo di otto elementi e realizzato nuovi arrangiamenti di classici del “Great American Songbook” associati a The Voice. Concentrandosi sugli anni in cui ha inciso per la Capitol, ossia sulla produzione che va dalla metà del 1950 fino all’ intramontabile concerto Sands con Count Basie 10 anni dopo , “Denny Ilett Sings Sinatra” promette di essere il modo migliore per celebrare il grande crooner e la sua musica!

Denny Ilett è attivo da oltre 30 anni quale cantante, chitarrista, bandleader, arrangiatore e insegnante. Collabora regolarmente con Lillian Boutté e Pee Wee Ellis, scrive per la rivista Guitarist, ed è direttore dell’International Jazz and Blues Festivaldi Bristol. Suona inoltre in diversi gruppi che portano il suo nome.

A tribute to Frank Sinatra: the Capitol years

In this wonderful new show to mark the centenary of Frank Sinatra, Denny Ilett has assembled a swinging octet and crafted new arrangements on ‘Great American Songbook’ classics forever associated with Ol’ Blue Eyes. Focusing on Frank’s ‘Capitol’ years from the mid 1950’s through to the timeless Sands concert with Count Basie 10 years later, ‘Denny Ilett sings Sinatra’ promises to be the perfect way to celebrate The Man And His Music!

Denny Ilett has been active as a vocalist, guitarist, bandleader, arranger and teacher for 30 years. He works regularly with Lillian Boutté and Pee Wee Ellis, writes for Guitarist magazine, and is director of the Bristol International Jazz and Blues festival aside from running several groups under his own name.

– See more at:

Concert at the Palace Theater. Ho’okia’i Lili’uokalani: By and By Ho’i Mai ‘Oe

Concert at the Palace Theater. Ho'okia'i Lili'uokalani: By and By Ho’i Mai ‘Oe



Views:6|Rating:5.00|View Time:4:37Minutes|Likes:1|Dislikes:0
An afternoon of the Queen’s music and her final journey.

Cymber Lily Quinn first moved to the Hilo area in 2004, and met the Queen’s music through Keola Beamer’s lovely interpretation of “Sanoe.” Cymber quickly fell in love with slack key music and a deeper affair with modern Hawaiian music in general.

At a visit to Queen Emma’s Summer Palace on O’ahu, Cymber found “The Queen’s Songbook,” the music of Queen Lilu’okalani, and began studying the stories and structures behind her songs. From the beginning, Cymber felt a deep but mysterious familiarity in the Queen’s music. “How could a culture so different produce music that felt so homey?” she wondered.

By tracing the lineage of the Queen’s influences, Cymber realized that the music had come from American missionaries and other church influences from the East Coast. That church music had in turn traveled hundreds of years before from England and Europe, where Cymber’s ancestors had immigrated from in 1638. The folk music of Cymber’s ancient Welsh ancestors had started traveling to America in the guise of church music 400 years ago. The music traveled again to meet Queen Lili’uokalani, who took to it like a fish to water…

When Cymber first arrived in Hawai’i in 2004, she heard modern Hawaiian music and immediately thought it would sound great on her own instrument, the harp. But sensitive to cultural appropriation, she played the Queen’s music in private for years, looking for a way to bring the music out that honored the Queen and Hawaiian culture. She found her link when she discovered that the autoharp was one of Her Majesty’s favorite instruments for composing.

Around the same time, she was introduced to Kathy Dorn, flutist, who also has a deep affection and respect for the Queen’s music and its place in Hawai’i’s story. Kathy and Cymber have performed the Queen’s music for Hospice of Hilo Benefit Concert, Music in Lili’uoklani Gardens, for the 100th Memorial Service for Her Majesty, and now today’s performance.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Blessings

Stop by my website, and sign up for my newsletter. I’ll send you a free “11-Minutes Mini Seasons of the Soul,” a tiny-version of my full-length CD, Seasons of the Soul.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hey saawan aayo | Rajasthani folk | Kutley Khan and group | Bazm e Khas | live concert

Hey saawan aayo | Rajasthani folk | Kutley Khan and group | Bazm e Khas | live concert



Views:1|Rating:0.00|View Time:4:13Minutes|Likes:0|Dislikes:0
Kutle Khan and group are a multitalented folk musicians from the rich and vibrant land of Rajasthan, who has performed on various stages across the world.

This baithak was held at the initiative of Ved gupta as a part of bazm e Khas foundation live concerts.

The idea behind this purely non-monitized upload is to preserve this collection of great music for all music lovers and students of Hindustani music. We treat this upload as a cover version.

Click here to subscribe to our channel:

Concert at the Palace Theater. Ho’okia’i Lili’uokalani: Ahe Lau Makani

Concert at the Palace Theater. Ho'okia'i Lili'uokalani: Ahe Lau Makani



Views:1|Rating:0.00|View Time:2:31Minutes|Likes:0|Dislikes:0
An afternoon of the Queen’s music and her final journey.

Cymber Lily Quinn first moved to the Hilo area in 2004, and met the Queen’s music through Keola Beamer’s lovely interpretation of “Sanoe.” Cymber quickly fell in love with slack key music and a deeper affair with modern Hawaiian music in general.

At a visit to Queen Emma’s Summer Palace on O’ahu, Cymber found “The Queen’s Songbook,” the music of Queen Lilu’okalani, and began studying the stories and structures behind her songs. From the beginning, Cymber felt a deep but mysterious familiarity in the Queen’s music. “How could a culture so different produce music that felt so homey?” she wondered.

By tracing the lineage of the Queen’s influences, Cymber realized that the music had come from American missionaries and other church influences from the East Coast. That church music had in turn traveled hundreds of years before from England and Europe, where Cymber’s ancestors had immigrated from in 1638. The folk music of Cymber’s ancient Welsh ancestors had started traveling to America in the guise of church music 400 years ago. The music traveled again to meet Queen Lili’uokalani, who took to it like a fish to water…

When Cymber first arrived in Hawai’i in 2004, she heard modern Hawaiian music and immediately thought it would sound great on her own instrument, the harp. But sensitive to cultural appropriation, she played the Queen’s music in private for years, looking for a way to bring the music out that honored the Queen and Hawaiian culture. She found her link when she discovered that the autoharp was one of Her Majesty’s favorite instruments for composing.

Around the same time, she was introduced to Kathy Dorn, flutist, who also has a deep affection and respect for the Queen’s music and its place in Hawai’i’s story. Kathy and Cymber have performed the Queen’s music for Hospice of Hilo Benefit Concert, Music in Lili’uoklani Gardens, for the 100th Memorial Service for Her Majesty, and now today’s performance.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Blessings

Stop by my website, and sign up for my newsletter. I’ll send you a free “11-Minutes Mini Seasons of the Soul,” a tiny-version of my full-length CD, Seasons of the Soul.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Concert at the Palace Theater. Ho’okia’i Lili’uokalani: Ka Wiliwiliwai

Concert at the Palace Theater. Ho'okia'i Lili'uokalani: Ka Wiliwiliwai



Views:17|Rating:5.00|View Time:5:16Minutes|Likes:1|Dislikes:0
An afternoon of the Queen’s music and her final journey.

Cymber Lily Quinn first moved to the Hilo area in 2004, and met the Queen’s music through Keola Beamer’s lovely interpretation of “Sanoe.” Cymber quickly fell in love with slack key music and a deeper affair with modern Hawaiian music in general.

At a visit to Queen Emma’s Summer Palace on O’ahu, Cymber found “The Queen’s Songbook,” the music of Queen Lilu’okalani, and began studying the stories and structures behind her songs. From the beginning, Cymber felt a deep but mysterious familiarity in the Queen’s music. “How could a culture so different produce music that felt so homey?” she wondered.

By tracing the lineage of the Queen’s influences, Cymber realized that the music had come from American missionaries and other church influences from the East Coast. That church music had in turn traveled hundreds of years before from England and Europe, where Cymber’s ancestors had immigrated from in 1638. The folk music of Cymber’s ancient Welsh ancestors had started traveling to America in the guise of church music 400 years ago. The music traveled again to meet Queen Lili’uokalani, who took to it like a fish to water…

When Cymber first arrived in Hawai’i in 2004, she heard modern Hawaiian music and immediately thought it would sound great on her own instrument, the harp. But sensitive to cultural appropriation, she played the Queen’s music in private for years, looking for a way to bring the music out that honored the Queen and Hawaiian culture. She found her link when she discovered that the autoharp was one of Her Majesty’s favorite instruments for composing.

Around the same time, she was introduced to Kathy Dorn, flutist, who also has a deep affection and respect for the Queen’s music and its place in Hawai’i’s story. Kathy and Cymber have performed the Queen’s music for Hospice of Hilo Benefit Concert, Music in Lili’uoklani Gardens, for the 100th Memorial Service for Her Majesty, and now today’s performance.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Blessings

Stop by my website, and sign up for my newsletter. I’ll send you a free “11-Minutes Mini Seasons of the Soul,” a tiny-version of my full-length CD, Seasons of the Soul.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Raggle Taggle Gypsy with Lyrics – Celtic folk music Live Concert

The Raggle Taggle Gypsy with Lyrics - Celtic folk music Live Concert



Views:641519|Rating:4.93|View Time:3:18Minutes|Likes:2723|Dislikes:36
“The Raggle Taggle Gypsy”, is a traditional celtic folk music song that originated as a Scottish border ballad, and has been popular throughout Britain, Ireland and North America. It concerns a rich lady who runs off to join the gypsies (or one gypsy). Common alternative names are “The Raggle Taggle Gypsies O”, “The Gypsy Laddie(s)”, “Black Jack David” (or “Davy”) and “Seven Yellow Gypsies”. (Wikipedia) We first heard the song from Mike Scott from The Waterboys with Sharon Shannon and the chieftains

BUY THE SONG “RAGGLE TAGGLE GYPSY”

PATREON SUPPORT

FREE EXCLUSIVE VIDEOS BY EMAIL

SUBSCRIBE FOR RAPALJE VIDEOS EVERY WEEK

SCHEDULE
Sunday: Rapalje show

Wednesday: New music videos

RAPALJE
Homepage:
Merchandise:
Agenda:

FOLLOW US
Facebook:
Twitter:
Instagram:

Raggle Taggle Gypsy – Lyrics
(traditional)

There were three old gypsies came to our hall door
They came brave and boldly-o
And the one sang high and the other sang low
And the other sang a raggle taggle gypsy-o

It was upstairs, downstairs the lady went
Put on her suit of leather-o
There was a cry from around the door
She’s away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o

It was late that night when the lord came in
Inquiring for his lady-o
“Where is my bride?” says the servant girl:
“She’s away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o”

“Saddle for me my milk white steed
My big horse is not speedy-o
I will ride till I seek my bride
She’s away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o”

Now he rode east, and he rode west
He rode north and south also
Until at last he came to a wide open field
It was there that he spied his lady-o

“How could you leave your house and your land
How could you leave your money-o
How could you leave your only wedded lord
All for a raggle taggle gypsy-o”

“What care I for my house and my land
And what care I for my money-o?
I’d rather have a kiss from the yellow gypsy’s lips
I’m away with the raggle taggle gypsy-o”

“Tonight you slept in a goosefeather bed
Your blankets strewn so comely-o
How could you leave your newly wedded lord
All for a raggle taggle gypsy-o”

“What care I for my goosefeather bed
With blankets strewn so comely-o
Tonight I lay in a wide-open field
In the arms of the raggle taggle gypsy-o”

RAPALJE, Celtic Folk Music with a difference!

The musicians of Rapalje with their wild hair and medieval kilts create a flaming energy with their enthusiasm and motivation. With sensitive ballads, fiery songs and vivacious Celtic melodies Rapalje electrifies their audience. A concert of Rapalje is like a journey through time with recognizable licentiousness and a rough way of life.

Soundtrack download on iTunes and Amazon. Track from Live DVD, Recorded at De Groene Engel, Oss. Video by D’Images. Sound by SoundBase. www.rapalje.com

The Raggle Taggle Gypsy – Lyrics – Celtic folk music Live Concert #celticmusic

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Please watch: “Let’s design your new T-shirts – Rapalje Show 58”

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-

Celtic Folk Music Full Live Concert – Rapalje @ Bevrijdingsfestival Overijssel Zwolle, Netherlands

Celtic Folk Music Full Live Concert - Rapalje @ Bevrijdingsfestival Overijssel Zwolle, Netherlands



Views:6861|Rating:4.89|View Time:51:4Minutes|Likes:93|Dislikes:2
Rapalje celtic folk music live with bagpipes on fire – Wilhelmus @ Bevrijdingsfestival Overijssel, Zwolle The Netherlands (Nederland) #celticmusic. het Wilhelmus on Bagpipes and Irish dance . Rapalje performs for 30.000 visitors for almost an hour at one of the “Bevrijdingsfestivals” to celebrate the liberation of The Netherlands..

00:00 Het Wilhelmus / Glen Coe
05:20 Raggle Taggle Gyspy
09:37 The Galway Girl
13:42 Humours of Glendart
17:12 Caledonia
22:37 Jig of Slurs / Athol Highlanders
26:39 The Crown and the Ring
31:28 Wat zullen we Drinken
38:45 Drunken Sailor
46:00 Home is Where My Friends Are

When you subscribe here, we’ll send you a free exclusive music video every week

You can subscribe to RAPALJE videos every week on Sunday:

Homepage:
Merchandise:
Agenda:

The musicians of Rapalje with their wild hair and medieval kilts create a flaming energy with their enthusiasm and motivation. With sensitive ballads, fiery songs and vivacious Celtic melodies Rapalje electrifies their audience. A concert of Rapalje is like a journey through time with recognizable licentiousness and a rough way of life.

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Please watch: “Let’s design your new T-shirts – Rapalje Show 58”

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-

Mumu Fresh Feat. Black Thought & DJ Dummy: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert

Mumu Fresh Feat. Black Thought & DJ Dummy: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert



Views:500063|Rating:4.92|View Time:23:21Minutes|Likes:15139|Dislikes:248
July 11, 2018 | Abby O’Neill — Mumu Fresh sings that the teacher arrives when the student is ready. During a recent trip to the Tiny Desk, she came bearing life lessons from the depths of her soul.

A regal combination of black power and Native American pride, Mumu Fresh — also known by her birth name Maimouna Youssef — is an abundantly gifted singer and emcee who prances between genres and styles. The Baltimore native fuses her rich multi-octave range and ferocious rap delivery with spiritually-inclined lyrics so potent and mindful they precipitated a wellspring of emotion throughout the room.

Mumu is not new to NPR Music. During her guest appearance at February’s August Greene Tiny Desk, she stirred emotions with her verse on “Practice,” which spoke cathartically about the realities of being a black woman. Mumu began her own Tiny Desk in her native Lakota tongue with “Ink Pata,” signaling a call to prayer in a sacred ritual. Looped tribal chants of her own harmonies set the mood as delivered a stirring spoken word performance that journeyed through her ancestral lineage to the struggles of the present day.

With a buoyant and thoughtful spirit, Mumu and her band transitioned into the classic-sounding “Miracles” from Vintage Babies, her collaborative album with group mate DJ Dummy. Declaring it a celebration of soul music, she mixed sweet tender melodies with lyrics to empower those devoid of hope. It’s in this song that Mumu shared the proverb about the teacher and the student, while reminding us that we all have to be ready for blessings yet to come. It made for a fluid segue into “Work In Progress,” accented by the feel-good chords of The Roots keyboardist Ray Angry, an ebullient backdrop to Mumu’s humanizing and candid rap verse detailing her pathway to personal growth and self-love.

The set concludes with a new version of “Say My Name,” a song Mumu wrote about Sandra Bland, who died in police custody in 2015, and the impact it had on her. Starting off with a 1950s doo-wop circle, she blends traditional soul elements with politically relevant lyrics. Given Mumu’s stint writing and touring with The Roots after high school, it was only fitting to have front man and lyrical force Black Thought make a special guest appearance.

Set List

“Ink Pata”
“Miracles/Work in Progress”
“Say My Name” (feat. Black Thought)

Musicians
Maimouna Youssef (vocals), Andre “DJ Dummy” Smith (DJ), Black Thought (vocals), Chelsey Green (violin), Monique Brooks-Roberts (violin), Kevin Jones (cello), Corey Fonville (drums), Romier Mendez (bass), Ray Angry (keys), Amber Harmon (supporting vocals)

Credits
Producers: Abby O’Neill, Morgan Noelle Smith; Creative Director: Bob Boilen; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Videographers: Morgan Noelle Smith, Bronson Arcuri, Maia Stern, Khun Minn Ohn; Production Assistants: Catherine Zhang, Téa Mottolese; Photo: Eslah Attar/NPR.