Tag Archiv: records

Shirley Horn – Love For Sale (Mercury Records 1962)

Shirley Horn - Love For Sale (Mercury Records 1962)



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“Love for Sale” is a song by Cole Porter, from the musical The New Yorkers which opened on Broadway on December 8, 1930 and closed in May 1931 after 168 performances. The song is written from the viewpoint of a prostitute advertising various kinds of “love for sale”: “Old love, new love, every love but true love”.

The song’s chorus, like many in the Great American Songbook, is written in the A-A-B-A format. However, instead of 32 bars, it has 64, plus an 8-bar tag. The tag is often dropped when the song is performed. The tune, using what is practically a trademark for Porter, shifts between a major and minor feeling.

“Love for Sale” was originally considered in bad taste, even scandalous. In the initial Broadway production, it was performed by Kathryn Crawford, portraying a streetwalker, with three girlfriends (Waring’s Three Girl Friends) as back-up singers, in front of Reuben’s, a popular restaurant of the time. As a response to the criticism, the song was transferred from the white Crawford to the African American singer Elisabeth Welch, who sang with back-up singers in a scene set in front of Harlem’s Cotton Club.

Despite the fact the song was banned from radio airplay, or perhaps because of it, it became a hit, with Libby Holman’s version going to #5 and the “Fred Waring’s Pennsylvanians” version going to #14, both in 1931. (All other 1931 recordings of the song were as an instrumental.)

Notable recordings since include Hal Kemp in 1939, Billie Holiday in 1945, Stan Kenton in 1950 (arranged by Pete Rugolo), Joyce Bryant in 1952, Eartha Kitt in the 1950s, Ella Fitzgerald in 1956, and again in 1972 on her Ella Loves Cole album, Tony Bennett in 1957, Miles Davis and Cannonball Adderley for 1958 Miles and Somethin’ Else, Anita O’Day in 1959, Dexter Gordon in 1962, Al Hirt on his 1965 album, Live at Carnegie Hall, The Manhattan Transfer in 1976, the German disco group Boney M. in 1977, Donald Byrd on the Love Byrd album in 1981, Elvis Costello live on the remastered Rhino Entertainment CD of his 1981 record Trust. Harvey Fierstein performs a memorable (if interrupted) version in the movie version of his play Torch Song Trilogy. Martin Smith sang the song in the Cole Porter revue A Swell Party – A Celebration of Cole Porter at London’s Vaudeville Theatre in 1992. Simply Red led by Mick Hucknall sang this song at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1992. Harry Connick, Jr. covered it in 1999 on his album Come by Me. Amanda Lear recorded a version in 2006.

Other vocal versions include Mel Torme’s, Dinah Washington’s, Liza Minnelli’s, Diane Schuur’s, Dianne Reeves’, Cyrille Aimée’s and Fine Young Cannibals’. The song has become a jazz standard.

Shirley Valerie Horn (May 1, 1934 — October 20, 2005) was an American jazz singer and pianist. Horn collaborated with many jazz greats including Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Toots Thielemans, Ron Carter, Carmen McRae, Wynton Marsalis and others. She was most noted for her ability to accompany herself with nearly incomparable independence and ability on the piano while singing, something described by arranger Johnny Mandel as “like having two heads”, and for her rich, lush voice, a smoky contralto, which was described by noted producer and arranger Quincy Jones as “like clothing, as she seduces you with her voice”. Although she could swing as strongly as any straight-ahead jazz artist, Horn’s reputation rode on her exquisite ballad work.

Shirley Horn kept for twenty five years the same rhythm section: Charles Ables (bass) and Steve Williams (drums). Don Heckman wrote in the Los Angeles Times (February 2, 1995) about “the importance of bassist Charles Ables and drummer Steve Williams to Horn’s sound. Working with boundless subtlety, following her every spontaneous twist and turn, they were the ideal accompanists for a performer who clearly will tolerate nothing less than perfection”.

Due to health problems in the early 2000s, Horn had to cut back on her performances. After 2002, a foot amputation (from complications of diabetes) forced her to leave the piano playing to pianist George Mesterhazy. In late 2004, Horn felt able to play piano again, and recorded a live album for Verve, at Manhattan’s Au Bar with trumpet player Roy Hargrove, which did not satisfy her. It remains unreleased except for tracks on But Beautiful – The Best of Shirley Horn.

A breast cancer survivor, she had been battling diabetes when she died of complications from it at the age of 71. She is interred at Ft. Lincoln Cemetery in Washington, D.C.

Shirley is accompanied by Jerome Richardson (flute, woodwind); Frank Wess (flute, tenor sax); Al Cohn (tenor sax); Gerry Mulligan (baritone sax); Joe Newman (trumpet); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Milt Hinton (double bass); Osie Johnson (drums); Gene Orloff (violin); Hank Jones (piano); and Jimmy Jones (piano/arr/cond). Recorded September 13, 15, 1962 in New York City. (Mercury Records)

Louis Armstrong – What A Wonderful World (Original Spoken Intro Version) ABC Records 1967, 1970

Louis Armstrong - What A Wonderful World (Original Spoken Intro Version) ABC Records 1967, 1970



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“What a Wonderful World” [1970 Spoken Introduction Version] along with Oliver Nelson’s Orchestra is a song written by Bob Thiele (as George Douglas) and George David Weiss. It was first recorded by Louis Armstrong and released as a single in 1967. Thiele and Weiss were both prominent in the music world (Thiele as a producer and Weiss as a composer/performer). Armstrong’s recording was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. Intended as an antidote for the increasingly racially and politically charged climate of everyday life in the United States, the song also has a hopeful, optimistic tone with regard to the future, with reference to babies being born into the world and having much to look forward to. The song was initially offered to Tony Bennett, who turned it down. Thereafter, it was offered to Louis Armstrong.

Louis Armstrong (August 4, 1901 — July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana.

Coming to prominence in the 1920s as an “inventive” trumpet and cornet player, Armstrong was a foundational influence in jazz, shifting the focus of the music from collective improvisation to solo performance. With his instantly recognizable gravelly voice, Armstrong was also an influential singer, demonstrating great dexterity as an improviser, bending the lyrics and melody of a song for expressive purposes. He was also skilled at scat singing (vocalizing using sounds and syllables instead of actual lyrics).

Renowned for his charismatic stage presence and voice almost as much as for his trumpet-playing, Armstrong’s influence extends well beyond jazz music, and by the end of his career in the 1960s, he was widely regarded as a profound influence on popular music in general. Armstrong was one of the first truly popular African-American entertainers to “cross over”, whose skin color was secondary to his music in an America that was severely racially divided. He rarely publicly politicized his race, often to the dismay of fellow African-Americans, but took a well-publicized stand for desegregation during the Little Rock Crisis. His artistry and personality allowed him socially acceptable access to the upper echelons of American society that were highly restricted for a black man.

Armstrong died of a heart attack in his sleep on July 6, 1971 at the age of 69, 11 months after playing a famous show at the Waldorf-Astoria’s Empire Room. He was residing in Corona, Queens, New York City, at the time of his death. He was interred in Flushing Cemetery, Flushing, in Queens, New York City. His honorary pallbearers included Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Dizzy Gillespie, Pearl Bailey, Count Basie, Harry James, Frank Sinatra, Ed Sullivan, Earl Wilson, Alan King, Johnny Carson and David Frost. Peggy Lee sang The Lord’s Prayer at the services while Al Hibbler sang “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen” and Fred Robbins, a long-time friend, gave the eulogy.

Armstrong was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1972 by the Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. This Special Merit Award is presented by vote of the Recording Academy’s National Trustees to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording. Recordings of Armstrong were inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, which is a special Grammy award established in 1973 to honor recordings that are at least twenty-five years old, and that have “qualitative or historical significance.”

“Some of you young folks been saying to me
” Hey Pops, what you mean ‘What a wonderful world’?

How about all them wars all over the place?
You call them wonderful?

And how about hunger and pollution?
That ain’t so wonderful either.”

Well how about listening to old Pops for a minute.
Seems to me, it aint the world that’s so bad
but what we’re doin’ to it.

And all I’m saying is see what a wonderful world
It would be if only we’d give it a chance.
Love baby, love. That’s the secret, yeah.
If lots more of us loved each other
we’d solve lots more problems.
And then this world would be gasser.

That’s wha’ ol’ Pops keeps saying.”

I see trees of green, red roses too
I see them bloom, for me and you
And I think to myself
What a wonderful world

I see skies of blue, and clouds of white
The bright blessed day, dark sacred night
And I think to myself
What a wonderful world

The colors of the rainbow, so pretty in the sky
Are also on the faces, of people going by
I see friends shaking hands, sayin’, “How do you do?”
They’re really sayin’, “I love you”

I hear babies cryin’, I watch them grow
They’ll learn much more, than I’ll ever know
And I think to myself
What a wonderful world

Yes, I think to myself
What a wonderful world
Oh yeah!

A Life in the Day of Those Old Records – Rugeley

A Life in the Day of Those Old Records - Rugeley



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A Life in the Day of Those Old Records is a film about the unique record shop that is run by the incomparable Chris McGranaghan.

Those Old Records is a mecca for collectors and lovers of vinyl with people travelling as far as Japan to purchase records and share tales with Chris.

You can find more information about the shop and make a pilgrimage here.

Billie Holiday – (Our) Love Is Here To Stay (Verve Records 1957)

Billie Holiday - (Our) Love Is Here To Stay (Verve Records 1957)



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“Our Love Is Here to Stay” is a popular song and a jazz standard. The music was written by George Gershwin, the lyrics by Ira Gershwin, for the movie The Goldwyn Follies (1938) which was released shortly after George Gershwin’s death. It is performed in the film by Kenny Baker. “Our Love Is Here to Stay” also appeared, perhaps most memorably, in the 1951 MGM picture An American in Paris, for which it served as the main theme. It also appeared in 1995’s Forget Paris in which it is actually a reference to An American In Paris. The song was the last composition George Gershwin completed. Ira Gershwin wrote the words after his brother’s death, giving the song a special poignancy.

Originally titled “It’s Here to Stay” and then “Our Love Is Here to Stay”, the song was finally published as “Love Is Here to Stay”. Ira Gershwin has said that he wanted to change the song’s name back to “Our Love Is Here to Stay” for years, but felt that it wouldn’t be right since the song had already become a standard. The song is emblematic of the Great American Songbook, with both an introductory verse and a chorus.

Accompanied with Billie, Joe Mondragon (bass), Alvin Stoller (drums), Barney Kessel (guitar), Jimmy Rowles (piano), Norman Granz (producer), Ben Webster (saxophone [tenor]) and Harry Edison (trumpet). (Verve Records)

It’s very clear
Our love is here to stay;
Not for a year
But ever and a day.
The radio and the telephone and the movies that we know
May just be passing fancies,
And in time may go.
But, oh my dear,
Our love is here to stay;
Together we’re going a long, long way.
In time the rockies may crumble, gibraltar may tumble,
They’re only made of clay,
But our love is here to stay

It’s very clear
Our love is here to stay;
Not for a year
But ever and a day.
The radio and the telephone and the movies that we know
May just be passing fancies,
And in time may go.
But, oh my dear,
Our love is here to stay;
Together we’re going a long, long, long, long way.
In time the rockies may crumble, gibraltar may tumble,
They’re only made of clay,
But our love is here to stay

Sarah Vaughan – Dancing In The Dark (Mercury Records 1956)

Sarah Vaughan - Dancing In The Dark (Mercury Records 1956)



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“Dancing in the Dark” is a popular song, with music by Arthur Schwartz and lyrics by Howard Dietz, that was first introduced by John Barker in the 1931 revue The Band Wagon. The 1941 recording by Artie Shaw and His Orchestra earned Shaw one of his eight gold records at the height of the Big Band era of the 1930s and 1940s.

It was subsequently featured in the classic 1953 MGM musical The Band Wagon and has since come to be considered part of the Great American Songbook. In the film it is given a ‘sensual and dramatic’ orchestration by Conrad Salinger for a ballet performance by Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse.

Sarah’s accompanied by Hal Mooney and His Studio Orchestra. Recorded in New York, October 29, 1956. (Mercury Records)

What though love is old
What though song is old
Through them we can be young

Hear this heart of mine
Make yours part of mine
Dear one, tell me that we’re one

Dancin’ in the dark till the tune ends
We’re dancin’ in the dark and it soon ends
We’re waltzin’ in the wonder of why we’re here
Time hurries by–we’re here and gone

Lookin’ for the light of a new love
To brighten up the night I have you, love
And we can face the music together
Dancing in the dark
Dancing in the dark

Sarah Vaughan ft Hal Mooney & His Studio Orchestra – Someone To Watch Over Me (EmArcy Records 1957)

Sarah Vaughan ft Hal Mooney & His Studio Orchestra  - Someone To Watch Over Me (EmArcy Records 1957)



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“Someone to Watch Over Me” is a song composed by George Gershwin with lyrics by Ira Gershwin from the musical Oh, Kay! (1926), where it was introduced by Gertrude Lawrence. It has been performed by numerous artists since its debut and is a jazz standard as well as a key work in the Great American Songbook.

Sarah’s accompanied by Hal Mooney and His Studio Orchestra. Recorded New York, March 20, 1957. (EmArcy Records affiliate of Mercury Records)

There’s a saying old
Says that love is blind
Still we’re often told
“Seek and ye shall find”
So I’m going to seek
A certain lad
I’ve had in mind

Looking everywhere
Haven’t found him yet
He’s the big affair
I cannot forget
Only man I ever think
Of with regret

I’d like
To add his inital
To my monogram
Tell me
Where is the shepherd
For this lost lamb?

There’s a somebody
I’m longin’ to see
I hope that he turns
Out to be
Someone to watch over me

I’m a little lamb
Who’s lost in the wood
I know I could
Always be good
To one
Who’ll watch over me

Although he may
Not be the man some
Girls think
Of as handsome
To my heart
He carries the key

Won’t you tell him please
To put on some speed
Follow my lead
Oh, how I need
Someone to watch over me

Won’t you tell him please
To put on some speed
Follow my lead
Oh, how I need
Someone to watch over me
Someone to watch over me

Billie Holiday – It Had To Be You (Clef Records 1955)

Billie Holiday - It Had To Be You (Clef Records 1955)



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“It Had to Be You” is a popular song written by Isham Jones, with lyrics by Gus Kahn, and was first published in 1924. The song was performed by Priscilla Lane in the 1939 film The Roaring Twenties and by Danny Thomas in the 1951 film I’ll See You in My Dreams.

The lyrics explain why the singer puts up with a domineering partner. The reason offered is depth of attachment: “somebody who could make me be true, could make me be blue.” However, domination itself may be the attraction: “some others I’ve seen might never be mean, never be cross, try to be boss, but they wouldn’t do.” The singer concludes: “nobody else gave me a thrill … wonderful you, it had to be you.” However, the lyrics can be interpreted as a realistic and bemused commentary on the reality of attachment, a recognition that the beloved is not perfect but has significant flaws which can be tolerated and accepted because of her (or his) virtues. While “It Had to Be You” is not unique in taking this stand about romantic love, it does counterpose itself to the dominant pattern in the Great American Songbook of celebrating the beloved as a perfect angel. In any case, the complicated melody, minor chords, and ambiguous lyrics make this a classic torch song.

Billie’s accompanied by Benny Cater (alto sax), Artie Shapiro & John Simmons (bass), Larry Bunker (drums), Barney Kessel (guitar), Jimmy Rowles (piano), and Harry “Sweets” Edison (trumpet). Recorded August 23, 1955, Radio Recorders, Hollywood, California. (Clef Records)

It had to be you, it had to be you
I wandered around, and finally found, the somebody who
Could make me be true, could make me be blue
And even be glad, just to be sad, thinking of you

Some others I’ve seen, might never be mean
Might never be cross, or try to be boss but they wouldn’t do
For nobody else, gave me a thrill with all your faults, I love you still
It had to be you, wonderful you, it had to be you

It had to be you, it had to be you
I wandered around, and finally found, the somebody who
Could make me be true, could make me be blue
And even be glad, just to be sad, thinking of you

Some others I’ve seen, might never be mean
Might never be cross, or try to be boss but they wouldn’t do
For nobody else, gave me a thrill with all your faults, I love you still
It had to be you, wonderful you, it had to be you

Ella Fitzgerald – It’s Only A Paper Moon (Verve Records 1960)

Ella Fitzgerald - It's Only A Paper Moon (Verve Records 1960)



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“It’s Only a Paper Moon” is a popular song written by Harold Arlen and published in 1933, with lyrics by E. Y. Harburg and Billy Rose. It was written originally for an unsuccessful Broadway play called The Great Magoo, set in Coney Island. It was subsequently used in the movie Take a Chance, in 1933, and Paul Whiteman recorded a successful version, sung by Peggy Healey. But its lasting fame stems from recordings by popular artists during the last years of World War II, when versions by Ella Fitzgerald and the Nat King Cole Trio became popular. It has endured as a vehicle for improvisation by many jazz musicians.

There was a resurgence of interest in the song when the Paul Whiteman Orchestra’s recording was used in the 1973 Oscar-winning film Paper Moon.

Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Harold Arlen Songbook is a 1961 (see 1961 in music) album by the American jazz singer Ella Fitzgerald, with a studio orchestra conducted and arranged by Billy May. This album marked the only time that Fitzgerald worked with May.

The Harold Arlen Songbook is the sixth album in Fitzgerald’s series of recordings of songs written by the pantheon of Broadway composers who formed the body of work now considered the Great American Songbook.

Ella’s accompanied by Don Fagerquist (tp), Ted Nash (as), Plas Johnson (ts), Paul Smith (p), John Collins, Al Hendrickson (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Alvin Stoller (d), and Billy May (cnd, arr). Recorded August 1, 1960, Capitol Records, Los Angeles. (Verve Records)

Say, its only a paper moon
Sailing over a cardboard sea
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
If you believed in me

Yes, it’s only a canvas sky
Hanging over a muslin tree
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
If you believed in me

Without your love
It’s a honky-tonk parade
Without your love
It’s a melody played in a penny arcade

It’s a Barnum and Bailey world
Just as phony as it can be
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
If you believed in me

Say, its only a paper moon
Sailing over a cardboard sea
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
If you believed in me

Yes, it’s only a canvas sky
Hanging over a muslin tree
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
If you believed in me

Without your love
It’s a honky-tonk parade
Without your love
It’s a melody played in a penny arcade

It’s a Barnum and Bailey world
Just as phony as it can be
But it wouldn’t be make-believe
If you believed in me
But it wouldn’t be make-believe, believe
If you believed in me

Sarah Vaughan – That’s All (Mercury Records 1958)

Sarah Vaughan - That's All (Mercury Records 1958)



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Produced by Quincy Jones, “That’s All” is a 1952 song written by Alan Brandt and Bob Haymes. It has been covered by many jazz and blues artists. The song is part of the Great American Songbook. Nat King Cole first sang the song in 1953.

Sarrah’s accompanied by Quincy Jones (conductor/arranger), Zoot Sims, Jo and Marcel Hrasko, William Boucaya (reeds), Michel Hausser (vibes), Ronnell Bright (piano), Richard Davis, Pierre Michelot (bass), Kenny Clarke (drums) and Pierre Cullaz (guitar). Recorded in Paris, France, July 7, 1958.
Strings

I can only give you love that lasts forever
And a promise to be near each time you call
And the only heart I own for you and you alone

That’s all
That’s all

I can only give you country walks in springtime
And a hand to hold when leaves begin to fall
And a love whose burning light will warm the winter night

That’s all
That’s all

There are those, I am sure, who have told you
They would give you the world for a toy
All I have are these arms to enfold you
And a love time can never destroy

If you’re wondering what I’m asking in return, dear
You’ll be glad to know that my demands are small
Say it’s me that you’ll adore for now and ever more

That’s all
That’s all

If you’re wondering what I’m asking in return, dear
You’ll be glad to know that my demands are small
Say it’s me that you’ll adore for now and ever more

That’s all
That’s all

Ella Fitzgerald – Isn’t it Romantic? (Verve Records 1957)

Ella Fitzgerald - Isn't it Romantic? (Verve Records 1957)



Views:56373|Rating:4.99|View Time:3:6Minutes|Likes:354|Dislikes:1
“Isn’t It Romantic?” is a popular song and part of the Great American Songbook. The music was composed by Richard Rodgers, with lyrics by Lorenz Hart. It has a 32-bar chorus in ABAC form. Alec Wilder, in his book American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950, calls it “a perfect song”. It was introduced by Jeanette MacDonald and Maurice Chevalier in the Paramount film Love Me Tonight (1932). It has since been recorded numerous times, with and without vocals, by many jazz and popular artists. It has also since been featured in a number of movies.

Ella’s accompanied by Ray Linn (tp), Vincent DeRosa (frh), Chuck Gentry (bs, bcl), Bob Cooper (eh), Jule Kinzler (fl), Abe Most (cl), Arnold Koblentz (ob), Paul Smith (p, arr), Barney Kessel (g), Joe Mondragon (b), Alvin Stoller (d), and Buddy Bregman (cnd). Recorded August 31, 1956, Capitol Studios, Hollywood. (Verve Records)

Isn’t it romantic?
Music in the night, a dream that can be heard.

Isn’t it romantic?
Moving shadows write the oldest magic word.
I hear the breezes playing in the trees above
While all the world is saying you were meant for love.

Isn’t it romantic
Merely to be young on such a night as this?

Isn’t it romantic?
Every note that’s sung is like a lover’s kiss.

Sweet symbols in the moonlight,
Do you mean that I will fall in love perchance?
Isn’t it romance?

Sweet symbols in the moonlight,
Do you mean that I will fall in love perchance?
Isn’t it romantic?
Isn’t it romance?

Mirwood Records Northern Soul

Mirwood Records Northern Soul



Views:1188|Rating:4.38|View Time:23Minutes|Likes:7|Dislikes:1
A vinyl-only collection comprising 14 outstanding stompin’ soul dancers from Los Angeles.

The Mirwood label’s second release was Jackie Lee’s ‘The Duck’, a soul swinger that became a big hit and established the Mirwood sound. The house team of producer Fred Smith, arranger James Carmichael and songwriter Sherlie Matthews, along with contributions from veteran singer-songwriters Bob Relf and Earl Nelson (Bob & Earl) made uptempo soul perfection and they played that beat throughout 1965 and 1966.

Although more US chart action occurred with the Olympics and Bob & Earl, much of the Mirwood team’s superlative work fell on deaf American ears. It was the British soul aficionados of the early 70s who discovered these masterpieces to play on their burgeoning Northern Soul scene. The dancers revelled in the relentless beats, pleading vocals and sassy female backing.

Virtually any Jackie Lee track was a worthy contender, especially the soul dance classic ‘Do The Temptation Walk’, the master tape discovery ‘Anything You Want (Any Way You Want It)’, and the anthemic ‘Oh, My Darlin’’. Bob & Earl’s hottest number was actually the backing track to Bob’s speedy ‘My Little Girl’, discovered as an accidental UK LP cut in the late 60s. Under the same alias, Bobby Garrett, Bob had another monster sound with ‘I Can’t Get Away’. Ex-Ike Turner sideman Jimmy Thomas arrived at Mirwood in 1966 where Bob Relf recorded him on his own song ‘Where There’s A Will (There’sA Way)’. Jimmy brought the Ikettes along with him; the company switched their name to the Mirettes for the Sherlie Matthews-penned ‘I Wanna Do Everything For You Baby’ and others. Sherlie also composed the stomping ‘Mine Exclusively’ and ‘The Same Old Thing’ for the Olympics and ‘Don’t Pretend’ for the Belles, a studio group comprising of herself along with sisters Brenda and Patrice Holloway.

Another Los Angeles stable under the auspices of Henry “Hank” Graham threw the Performers’ ‘I Can’t Stop You’ into the mix and renamed singer Jimmy Conwell as Richard Temple for a 45 that epitomises Northern Soul, ‘That Beatin’ Rhythm’; a credo for a cult. More indie productions came from Eddie LaShae with the Sheppards’ redoubtable ‘Stubborn Heart’ and Sonny Knight’s production of Curtis Lee on ‘Is She In Your Town?’.

Altogether 14 vital mid-60s dance records that demonstrate why Mirwood is a byword for the best in Northern Soul.

ADY CROASDELL

Nancy Wilson – Who Can I Turn To? (Capitol Records 1965)

Nancy Wilson - Who Can I Turn To? (Capitol Records 1965)



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“Who Can I Turn To?” or “Who Can I Turn To (When Nobody Needs Me)” is a song written by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley, published in 1964. The song was introduced in the musical The Roar of the Greasepaint — The Smell of the Crowd, which struggled in the United Kingdom in 1964 and then made a tour of the United States later that year. In 1964 Shirley Bassey recorded the song and released it as a single, however it failed to chart. Recorded by Tony Bennett, “Who Can I Turn To?” became a hit, reaching number 33 on the U.S. pop singles chart and the top 5 of the Adult Contemporary chart. So fueled, the musical arrived on Broadway for a successful run, and the song became one of Bennett’s staples. He later, re-recorded the song as a duet with Cuban-American pop superstar, Gloria Estefan as part of his 2012 album, Viva Duets.

Astrud Gilberto recorded a version that was sampled in The Black Eyed Peas song “Like That” from their album “Monkey Business”.

There is another song titled “Who Can I Turn To”. It’s written by Alec Wilder and William Engvick in 1941. It’s much less well known.

Gentle Is My Love is a 1965 studio album by Nancy Wilson. It spent 24 weeks on the Billboard Top 200, peaking at #17, and reached #7 on the Hot R&B LPs chart. The album contains a mixture of standards from the Great American Songbook and more recent popular material.

In his AllMusic review, William Ruhlmann says that Gentle Is My Love is “a collection of romantic ballads that Wilson addresses with her characteristic emotionalism and precision. The arrangements are full of lush string parts, and the tempos are taken deliberately.” Ruhlmann notes that Wilson covered several songs that were usually associated with men and performed as “soaring, heroic anthems,” whereas she turns them into “more intimate, reflective ballads.”

A 1970 re-issue of the album was entitled Who Can I Turn To

Who can I turn to
When nobody needs me?
My heart wants to know
And so I must go
Where destiny leads me

With no star to guide me
And no one beside me
I’ll go on my way
And, after the day
The darkness will hide me

And maybe tomorrow
I’ll find what I’m after
I’ll throw off my sorrow
Beg, steal, or borrow
my share of laughter
With you I could learn to
With you what a new day
But who can I turn to
If you turn away?