Tag Archiv: THOMAS

IRMA THOMAS – LONG AFTER TONIGHT IS…… NORTHERN SOUL

IRMA THOMAS - LONG AFTER TONIGHT IS...... NORTHERN SOUL



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Great version of the Jimmy Radcliffe classic ender. Born Irma Lee, as a teen she sang with a Baptist church choir, auditioning for Specialty Records as a 13-year old. By the age of 19 she had been married twice and had four children. Keeping her second ex-husband’s surname, she worked as a waitress in New Orleans, occasionally singing with bandleader Tommy Ridgley, who helped her land a record deal with the local Ron label. Her first single, “(You Can Have My Husband but) Don’t Mess with My Man,” was released in spring 1960, and reached number 22 on the Billboard R&B chart.
She then began recording on the Minit label, working with songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint on songs including “It’s Raining” and “Ruler of my Heart”, which was later reinterpreted by Otis Redding as “Pain In My Heart”. Imperial Records acquired Minit in 1963, and a string of successful releases followed. These included “Wish Someone Would Care” (her biggest national hit), its B-side “Break-a-Way” (later covered by Tracey Ullman among others), “Anyone Who Knows What Love Is” (co-written by the young Randy Newman), and “Time Is on My Side” (a song previously recorded by Kai Winding, and later by the Rolling Stones).
Although her first four Imperial singles all charted on Billboard’s pop chart, later releases were less successful, and, unlike her contemporaries Aretha Franklin, Gladys Knight and Dionne Warwick she never managed to cross over into mainstream commercial success. She recorded for Chess Records in 1967/68 with some success, the Otis Redding song “Good To Me” reaching the R&B chart. She then relocated to California, releasing records on various small labels, before returning to Louisiana, and in the early 1980s opened her own club, the Lion’s Den.

NORTHERN SOUL – IRMA THOMAS – WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO DO

NORTHERN SOUL - IRMA THOMAS - WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO DO



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The unrivaled Soul Queen of New Orleans — a title officially bestowed by local officials, no less — Irma Thomas ranks among Crescent City R&B’s greatest and most enduring musical ambassadors, never enjoying the coast-to-coast commercial success of contemporaries like Aretha Franklin and Etta James but nevertheless breathing the same rarified air in the minds of many soul music aficionados. Born Irma Lee in Ponchatoula, LA, on February 18, 1941, as a teen she sang with a Baptist church choir, even auditioning for Specialty Records as a 13-year-old. A year later, she gave birth to her first child, marrying the baby’s father and subsequently giving birth to another child before the union dissolved. At 17 she wed again, this time to one Andrew Thomas, having two more babies before she again divorced, all before the age of 20. Keeping her second ex-husband’s surname, Thomas went to work as a waitress at New Orleans’ Pimlico Club, occasionally sitting in with bandleader Tommy Ridgley. When the club’s owner dismissed her for spending more time singing than waiting tables, Ridgley agreed to help her land a record deal, setting up auditions with the local Minit and Ronn labels. The latter issued her saucy debut single, “You Can Have My Husband (But Don’t Mess with My Man),” in the spring of 1960, and the record quickly reached the number 22 spot on the Billboard R&B chart. However, Thomas accused Ronn of withholding royalties and after one more effort for the label, “A Good Man,” she briefly landed with the Bandy label, releasing 1961’s “Look Up” before relocating to Minit.

Thomas’ first Minit release, “Girl Needs Boy,” inaugurated a collaboration with songwriter and producer Allen Toussaint that would continue throughout her tenure with the label; although none of her six Minit singles were significant hits, each was brilliant, in particular 1962’s “It’s Raining” (memorably revived by filmmaker Jim Jarmusch for his cult classic Down by Law) and the following year’s “Ruler of My Heart,” reworked by Otis Redding as “Pain in My Heart.” Imperial Records acquired Minit in 1963, and Thomas’ contract was included in the deal. Her first single for the label, the starkly intimate “Wish Someone Would Care,” capitalized on Imperial’s deep pockets to vault into the Billboard pop Top 20, while its Jackie DeShannon/Sharon Sheeley-penned B-side, “Break-a-Way,” proved a massive hit on New Orleans radio, later accumulating cover versions by singers from Beryl Marsden to Tracey Ullman.

Steve Tyrell: Rock and Roll Lullaby feat. B.J. Thomas

Steve Tyrell: Rock and Roll Lullaby feat. B.J. Thomas



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GRAMMY WINNING VOCALIST STEVE TYRELL INVITES HIS LEGENDARY SONGWRITER AND ARTIST FRIENDS TO A HEARTFELT CELEBRATION OF ‘THAT LOVIN’ FEELING’

The Renowned Singer’s Ode To What He Calls “The Great American Songbook 2” Features Classics By Carole King, Leiber and Stoller, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil, Burt Bacharach and Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich – And Guest Appearances By Dave Koz, Neil Sedaka, B.J. Thomas, Bill Medley, Chuck Leavell and Judith Hill

Ever since his glorious surprise version of “The Way You Look Tonight” in the 1991 film “Father of The Bride” paved the way for his extraordinary second career as a GRAMMY Award winning vocalist/producer, Steve Tyrell has been setting A New Standard (the title of his 1999 debut album) for interpreting the Great American Songbook – most notably on Songs of Sinatra (which reached #5 on the Billboard Jazz Albums chart) and his most recent Concord Records release, It’s Magic: The Songs of Sammy Cahn (#2). On his 11th album, That Lovin’ Feeling, he celebrates what he calls “the Great American Songbook 2; the next generation of the Songbook,” recording seminal rock era classics penned by legendary songwriters (many renowned for hits penned at New York’s famed Brill Building) who are also cherished longtime friends.

While sharing the enduring magic of timeless songs by the songwriting teams of Carole King and Gerry Goffin, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil and Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich as well as Burt Bacharach, Neil Sedaka, Toni Wine and Carole Bayer Sager, That Lovin’ Feeling sets itself apart from most tribute recordings with spirited guest vocal appearances by Mann, B.J. Thomas, Neil Sedaka and Bill Medley in addition to renowned backup singer Judith Hill (featured in the Oscar winning documentary “20 Feet From Stardom”) and Tyrell’s daughter Lauryn Tyrell. The set also includes key instrumental contributions by Stoller, keyboardist Chuck Leavell, saxophonist Dave Koz and even playful hand claps by Jeff Barry.

Steve Tyrell- Rock and Roll Lullaby- featuring BJ Thomas

Steve Tyrell- Rock and Roll Lullaby- featuring BJ Thomas



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GRAMMY WINNING PRODUCER/ARTIST STEVE TYRELL INVITES HIS LEGENDARY SONGWRITER AND ARTIST FRIENDS TO A HEARTFELT CELEBRATION OF ‘THAT LOVIN’ FEELING’

The Renowned Singer’s Ode To What He Calls “The Great American Songbook 2” Features Classics By Carole King and Gerry Goffin, Leiber and Stoller, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil, Burt Bacharach and Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich – And Guest Appearances By Dave Koz, Neil Sedaka, B.J. Thomas, Bill Medley, Chuck Leavell and Judith Hill.

Ever since his glorious surprise version of “The Way You Look Tonight” in the 1991 film “Father of The Bride” paved the way for his extraordinary second career as a GRAMMY Award winning producer/vocalist, Steve Tyrell has been setting A New Standard (the title of his 1999 debut album) for interpreting the Great American Songbook – most notably on Songs of Sinatra (which reached #5 on the Billboard Jazz Albums chart) and his most recent Concord Records release, It’s Magic: The Songs of Sammy Cahn (#2). On his 11th album, That Lovin’ Feeling, he celebrates what he calls “the Great American Songbook 2; the next generation of the Songbook,” recording seminal rock era classics penned by legendary songwriters (many renowned for hits penned at New York’s famed Brill Building) who are also cherished longtime friends.

While sharing the enduring magic of timeless songs by the songwriting teams of Carole King and Gerry Goffin, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, Barry Mann & Cynthia Weil and Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich as well as Burt Bacharach, Neil Sedaka, Toni Wine and Carole Bayer Sager, That Lovin’ Feeling sets itself apart from most tribute recordings with spirited guest vocal appearances by Mann, B.J. Thomas, Neil Sedaka and Bill Medley in addition to renowned backup singer Judith Hill (featured in the Oscar winning documentary “20 Feet From Stardom”) and Tyrell’s daughter Lauryn Tyrell. The set also includes key instrumental contributions by Stoller, keyboardist Chuck Leavell, saxophonist Dave Koz and even playful hand claps by Jeff Barry and David Palmer (lyricist of Jazzman.)

Brighton Thomas – “It Had to Be You”

Brighton Thomas - "It Had to Be You"



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2016 Songbook Youth Ambassador Brighton Thomas of Burbank, California sings Isham Jones and Gus Kahn’s “It Had to Be You” during the Songbook Academy Finals on July 23rd. The Songbook Academy Finals is held at the Palladium in Carmel, Indiana.

The Songbook Academy® is a seven-day music intensive for high school students with an interest in the music of the Great American Songbook. To learn more, visit TheSongbook.org.